Hans the Dullard

By Hans Christian Andersen


[1]

Far in the interior of the country lay an old baronial hall, and in it lived an old proprietor, who had two sons,


[2]

which two young men thought themselves too clever by half.


[3]

They wanted to go out and woo the King’s daughter; for the maiden in question had publicly announced


[4]

that she would choose for her husband that youth who could arrange his words best.


[5]

So these two geniuses prepared themselves a full week for the wooing —


[6]

this was the longest time that could be granted them;


[7]

but it was enough, for they had had much preparatory information, and everybody knows how useful that is.


[8]

One of them knew the whole Latin dictionary by heart,


[9]

and three whole years of the daily paper of the little town into the bargain,


[10]

and so well, indeed, that he could repeat it all either backwards or forwards, just as he chose.


[11]

The other was deeply read in the corporation laws,


[12]

and knew by heart what every corporation ought to know;


[13]

and accordingly he thought he could talk of affairs of state, and put his spoke in the wheel in the council.


[14]

And he knew one thing more: he could embroider suspenders with roses and other flowers,


[15]

and with arabesques, for he was a tasty, light-fingered fellow.


[16]

“I shall win the Princess!” So cried both of them.


[17]

Therefore their old papa gave to each of them a handsome horse.


[18]

The youth who knew the dictionary and newspaper by heart had a black horse,


[19]

and he who knew all about the corporation laws received a milk-white steed.


[20]

Then they rubbed the corners of their mouths with fish-oil, so that they might become very smooth and glib.


[21]

All the servants stood below in the courtyard, and looked on while they mounted their horses;


[22]

and just by chance the third son came up.


[23]

For the proprietor had really three sons, though nobody counted the third with his brothers,


[24]

because he was not so learned as they, and indeed he was generally known as “Jack the Dullard.”


[25]

“Hallo!” said Jack the Dullard, “where are you going? I declare you have put on your Sunday clothes!”


[26]

“We’re going to the King’s court, as suitors to the King’s daughter.


[27]

“Don’t you know the announcement that has been made all through the country?” And they told him all about it.


[28]

“My word! I’ll be in it too!” cried Jack the Dullard; and his two brothers burst out laughing at him, and rode away.


[29]

“Father, dear,” said Jack, “I must have a horse too. I do feel so desperately inclined to marry!


[30]

“If she accepts me, she accepts me; and if she won’t have me, I’ll have her; but she shall be mine!”


[31]

“Don’t talk nonsense,” replied the old gentleman. You shall have no horse from me.


[32]

“You don’t know how to speak — you can’t arrange your words. Your brothers are very different fellows from you.”


[33]

“Well,” quoth Jack the Dullard,


[34]

“If I can’t have a horse, I’ll take the Billy-goat, who belongs to me, and he can carry me very well!”


[35]

And so said, so done.


[36]

He mounted the Billy-goat, pressed his heels into its sides, and galloped down the high street like a hurricane.


[37]

“Hei, houp! that was a ride! Here I come!” shouted Jack the Dullard, and he sang till his voice echoed far and wide.


[38]

But his brothers rode slowly on in advance of him.


[39]

They spoke not a word, for they were thinking about the fine extempore speeches they would have to bring out,


[40]

and these had to be cleverly prepared beforehand.


[41]

“Hallo!” shouted Jack the Dullard, “Here am I!


[42]

“Look what I have found on the high road.” And he showed them what it was, and it was a dead crow.


[43]

“Dullard!” exclaimed the brothers, “what are you going to do with that?”


[44]

“With the crow? why, I am going to give it to the Princess.”


[45]

“Yes, do so,” said they; and they laughed, and rode on.


[46]

“Hallo, here I am again! Just see what I have found now; you don’t find that on the high road every day!”


[47]

And the brothers turned round to see what he could have found now.


[48]

“Dullard!” they cried, “that is only an old woman’s shoe, and the upper part is missing into the bargain;


[49]

are you going to give that also to the Princess?”


[50]

“Most certainly I shall,” replied Jack the Dullard; and again the brothers laughed


[51]

and rode on, and thus they got far in advance of him; but —


[52]

“Hallo-hop rara!” and there was Jack the Dullard again.


[53]

“It is getting better and better,” he cried. “Hurrah! it is quite famous.”


[54]

“Why, what have you found this time?” enquired the brothers.


[55]

“O,” said Jack the Dullard, “I can hardly tell you. How glad the Princess will be!”


[56]

“Bah!” said the brothers; “that is nothing but clay out of the ditch.”


[57]

“Yes, certainly it is,” said Jack the Dullard; “and clay of the finest sort.


[58]

“See, it is so wet, it runs through one’s fingers.”


[59]

And he filled his pocket with the clay.


[60]

But his brothers galloped on till the sparks flew,


[61]

and consequently they arrived a full hour earlier at the town gate than could Jack.


[62]

Now at the gate each suitor was provided with a number,


[63]

and all were placed in rows immediately on their arrival, six in each row,


[64]

and so closely packed together that they could not move their arms;


[65]

and that was a prudent arrangement, for they would certainly have come to blows,


[66]

had they been able, merely because one of them stood before the other.


[67]

All the inhabitants of the country roundabout stood in great crowds around the castle, almost under the very windows,


[68]

to see the Princess receive the suitors; and as each stepped into the hall, his power of speech went right out.


[69]

“Good for nothing!” said the King’s daughter; “out with him!”


[70]

At last the turn came for that brother who knew the dictionary by heart;


[71]

but he did not know it now; he had absolutely forgotten it altogether;


[72]

and the boards seemed to re-echo with his footsteps, and the ceiling of the hall was made of looking-glass,


[73]

so that he saw himself standing on his head;


[74]

and at the window stood three clerks and a head clerk, and every one of them was writing down every single word that was uttered,


[75]

so that it might be printed in the newspapers, and sold for a penny at the street corners.


[76]

It was a terrible ordeal, and they had, moreover, made such a fire in the stove, that the room seemed quite red hot.


[77]

“It is dreadfully hot here!” observed the first Brother.


[78]

“Yes,” replied the Princess, “my father is going to roast young pullets today.”


[79]

“Baa!” there he stood like a baa-lamb.


[80]

He had not been prepared for a speech of this kind, and had not a word to say, though he intended to say something witty. “Baa!”


[81]

“Good for nothing!” said the Princess; “off with him!”


[82]

And he was obliged to go accordingly.


[83]

And now the second brother came in.


[84]

“It is terribly warm,” he observed.


[85]

“Yes, we’re roasting pullets today,” replied the Princess.


[86]

“What — what were you — were you pleased to ob — ob” — stammered he — and all the clerks wrote down, “pleased to ob —”


[87]

“Good for nothing!” said the Princess. “Away with him!”


[88]

Now came the turn of Jack the Dullard. He rode into the hall on his goat.


[89]

“Well, it’s almost abominably hot here.”


[90]

“Yes, because I’m roasting young pullets,” replied the Princess.


[91]

“Ah, that’s lucky!” exclaimed Jack the Dullard, “for I suppose you’ll let me roast my crow at the same time?”


[92]

“With the greatest pleasure,” said the Princess.


[93]

“But have you anything you can roast it in? for I have neither pot nor pan.”


[94]

“Certainly I have!” said Jack. “Here’s a cooking utensil with a tin handle.”


[95]

And he brought out the old wooden shoe, and put the crow into it.


[96]

“Well, that is a famous dish!” said the Princess. “But what shall we do for sauce?”


[97]

“O, I have that in my pocket,” said Jack. “I have so much of it that I can afford to throw some away;”


[98]

and poured some of the clay out of his pocket.


[99]

“I like that!” said the Princess. “You can give an answer, and you have something to say for yourself, and so you shall be my husband.


[100]

“But are you aware that every word we speak is being taken down, and will be published in the paper tomorrow?


[101]

“Look yonder and you will see in every window three clerks and a head clerk;


[102]

and the old head clerk is the worst of all, for he can’t understand anything.”


[103]

But she only said this to frighten Jack the Dullard;


[104]

and the clerks gave a great crow of delight, and each one spurted a blot out of his pen on to the floor.


[105]

“O, those are the gentlemen, are they?” said Jack; “then I will give the best I have to the head clerk.”


[106]

And he turned out his pockets, and flung the wet clay full in the head clerk’s face.


[107]

“That was very cleverly done,” cried the Princess. “I couldn’t have done that; but I shall learn in time.”


[108]

And so Jack the Dullard was made a king, and received a crown and a wife, and sat upon a throne.


[109]

And we read this in the official report of the head clerk, but that is not altogether to be trusted.


 


Hans Christian Andersen. Hans the Dullard

© 2007-2016, Двуезична библиотека | Bglibrary.net.







Глупавия Ханс

Ханс Кристиан Андерсен


[1]

Далече във вътрешността на страната се намираше стар баронски замък, а в него живееше един стар господар, който имаше двама сина,


[2]

и тези двама младежи смятаха себе си за много умни.


[3]

Те възнамеряваха да спечелят ръката на кралската дъщеря, защото въпросната мома беше разгласила публично,


[4]

че ще избере за съпруг онзи момък, който най-добре умее да реди думите си.


[5]

И така, тези два таланта се готвиха цяла седмица за сгледата —


[6]

това беше най-дългото време, което можеха да им предоставят, —


[7]

но то бе достатъчно, защото бяха натрупали много предварителни познания, а всекиму е известно колко полезно е това.


[8]

Единият знаеше целия латински речник наизуст


[9]

и в добавка, всекидневния вестник на градчето за цели три години,


[10]

и то така добре, че можеше да го повтори целия — отзад-напред или отпред-назад, както си поиска.


[11]

Другият беше задълбочено изучил занаятчийските наредби


[12]

и знаеше наизуст всичко, което трябва да се знае в една занаятчийска задруга;


[13]

и поради това смяташе, че би могъл да говори по държавни въпроси и да дава съвети за управлението.


[14]

Той знаеше и още едно нещо: можеше да бродира тиранти с рози и други цветя


[15]

и с арабески, защото беше човек с вкус и сръчност.


[16]

— Аз ще спечеля принцесата! — извикаха и двамата.


[17]

Ето защо старият им баща даде на всеки от тях по един хубав кон.


[18]

Момъкът, който знаеше наизуст речника и вестника, се сдоби с черен кон,


[19]

а този, който знаеше всичко за занаятчийските наредби, получи млечнобял кон.


[20]

След това те натриха ъглите на устата си с рибено масло, за да станат съвсем гладки и гъвкави.


[21]

Цялата прислуга стоеше долу в двора и гледаше, докато те възсядаха конете си,


[22]

и изневиделица отнякъде се появи третият син.


[23]

Защото всъщност господарят имаше трима сина, въпреки че никой не броеше третия,


[24]

тъй като той не беше така учен като другите и беше известен с прозвището „Глупавия Ханс“.


[25]

— Хей! — рече Глупавия Ханс — Накъде сте се запътили? Брей, облекли сте се като за празник!


[26]

— Отиваме в двореца на краля като кандидати за кралската дъщеря.


[27]

Не си ли чул какво разгласиха из цялата страна? — и те всичко му разказаха.


[28]

— Ей Богу! И аз ще участвам! — извика Глупавия Ханс, а двамата му братя прихнаха да се смеят и отпътуваха.


[29]

— Скъпи татко — каза Ханс — на мен също ми трябва кон. Страшно ми се иска да се оженя!


[30]

Ако ме вземе — вземе, но ако не ме иска, аз ще я взема; и пак ще бъде моя!


[31]

— Стига си говорил глупости — отвърна старият господин. — От мен ти кон няма да получиш.


[32]

Ти не знаеш как да приказваш — две свързани думи не можеш да кажеш. Братята ти са съвсем друго нещо.


[33]

— Е — продума Глупавия Ханс —


[34]

като не ми даваш кон, ще взема козела, той си е мой и може да ме носи много добре!


[35]

И речено-сторено:


[36]

той възседна козела, заби пети в хълбоците му и като вихър се понесе надолу по главния път.


[37]

— Хей, хоп! Това се казва езда! Ето ме, идвам! — извика Глупавия Ханс и запя така, че гласът му закънтя надлъж и шир.


[38]

A братята му продължаваха да яздят бавно пред него.


[39]

Те не казваха нито дума, защото си мислеха за изисканите непринудени беседи, които щяха да проведат,


[40]

и които трябваше в тънкости да се подготвят предварително.


[41]

— Хей! — извика Глупавия Ханс. — Ето ме!


[42]

Вижте какво намерих на главния път — и им го показа, а то беше една умряла врана.


[43]

— Глупчо! — извикаха братята. — Какво смяташ да правиш с това?


[44]

— С враната ли? Че как, ще я подаря на принцесата.


[45]

— Бива, бива, подари й я — казаха те, изсмяха се и продължиха нататък.


[46]

— Хей, ето ме пак! Вижте само какво намерих сега; такова нещо не се намира на главния път всеки ден!


[47]

И братята се обърнаха да видят какво може да е намерил този път.


[48]

— Глупчо! — извикаха те. — Та това е само стара женска обувка, а й липсва и горната част.


[49]

И това ли смяташ да подариш на принцесата?


[50]

— Разбира се! — отвърна Глупавия Ханс и братята отново се изсмяха


[51]

и продължиха нататък, и вече бяха доста далече пред него, когато…


[52]

— Хей, хопала! — и ето ти го Глупавия Ханс отново.


[53]

— Става все по-добре — извика той. — Ура! Страхотно е!


[54]

— Защо, какво си намерил този път? — попитаха братята.


[55]

— О — каза Глупавия Ханс — трудно ми е да ви обясня. Колко ще се зарадва принцесата!


[56]

— Пфу! — казаха братята, — та това е само глина от крайпътния ров.


[57]

— Точно така — отвърна Глупавия Ханс, — но глина от най-добро качество.


[58]

Вижте колко е влажна, хлъзга се през пръстите.


[59]

И той напълни джоба си с глина.


[60]

Но братята му препуснаха напред, тъй че от копитата захвърчаха искри,


[61]

и поради това пристигнаха цял час преди него при градската порта.


[62]

А при портата всеки кандидат получаваше номер


[63]

и веднага щом пристигнеха, всички биваха подреждани в редици по шестима


[64]

и то така наблъскани един до друг, че не можеха да помръднат с ръка.


[65]

Това беше благоразумна мярка, защото те сигурно щяха да се сбият,


[66]

ако можеха, само защото някой от тях стои пред другия.


[67]

Всички жители на околността се тълпяха на големи групи около замъка, почти под самите прозорци,


[68]

за да видят как принцесата приема кандидатите, ала щом някой влезеше в залата, красноречието му се изпаряваше.


[69]

— Не струва! — казваше кралската дъщеря. — Да се маха!


[70]

Най-после дойде ред на този от братята, който знаеше речника наизуст,


[71]

но той не го знаеше сега, беше го забравил напълно.


[72]

Дъските по пода сякаш отекваха под стъпките му, а таванът на залата бе направен от огледало,


[73]

така че той се видя да стои с главата надолу.


[74]

До прозореца пък стояха трима писари и един главен писар и всеки от тях записваше всяка изречена дума,


[75]

за да може да се отпечати във вестниците и да се продава за по една парa по кръстовищата.


[76]

Беше ужасно преживяване и отгоре на всичко бяха така силно напалили печката, че залата сякаш беше нагорещена до червено.


[77]

— Тук е ужасно горещо — забеляза първият брат.


[78]

— Да — отвърна принцесата, — баща ми ще пече днес млади ярки.


[79]

— Бее! — той стоеше там като овца.


[80]

За такъв вид разговори не беше подготвен и нищо не му идваше на ум, колкото и да се мъчеше да каже нещо остроумно. — Бее!


[81]

— Не струва! — каза принцесата. — Изведете го!


[82]

И той беше принуден да си върви на свой ред.


[83]

Ето че влезе и вторият брат.


[84]

— Тук е ужасно топло! — забеляза той.


[85]

— Да, днес печем ярки — отвърна принцесата.


[86]

— Какво… какво имахте честта да заб… заб… — заекна той и всички писари записаха „имахте честта да заб…“


[87]

— Не струва! — каза принцесата. — Изведете го!


[88]

Дойде редът и на Глупавия Ханс. Той влезе в залата, яхнал козела си.


[89]

— Ей, тук е отвратително горещо.


[90]

— Да, защото пека млади ярки — отвърна принцесата.


[91]

— А, какъв късмет! — възкликна Глупавия Ханс. — Вероятно ще ми позволите да си изпека през това време и моята врана?


[92]

— С най-голямо удоволствие — каза принцесата. —


[93]

Но имате ли в какво да я изпечете, защото аз нямам нито гърне, нито тава?


[94]

— Разбира се, че имам! — каза Ханс. — Ето един готварски прибор с тенекиена дръжка.


[95]

И той извади старата дървена обувка и сложи враната в нея.


[96]

— Е, това е чудесно ястие! — каза принцесата. — Но какво ще използваме за сос?


[97]

— О, аз имам в джоба си — каза Ханс. — Имам толкова много, че мога да си позволя да изхабя малко от него.


[98]

И той изсипа от джоба си малко глина.


[99]

— Това ми харесва! — каза принцесата. — Ти можеш да отговаряш, имаш какво да кажеш от себе си и затова ще бъдеш мой съпруг.


[100]

Но знаеш ли, че всяка дума, която казваме, се записва и ще бъде публикувана утре във вестника?


[101]

Погледни там и ще видиш при всеки прозорец по трима писари и един главен писар


[102]

и старият главен писар е най-лошият от всички, защото нищо не разбира.


[103]

Но тя каза това само за да изплаши Глупавия Ханс,


[104]

а писарите изграчиха от удоволствие и всеки от тях капна по една капка от писалката си на пода.


[105]

— О, онези господа ли? — каза Глупавия Ханс — Тогава аз ще дам най-хубавото, което остана, на главния писар.


[106]

И той обърна джобовете си и хвърли мократа глина право в лицето на главния писар.


[107]

— Това беше много ловко — извика принцесата. — Аз не бих могла да го направя, но с времето ще се науча.


[108]

И така, Глупавия Ханс стана крал, получи жена и корона и седна на трона.


[109]

А ние прочетохме това в официалния доклад на главния писар, но на него не може напълно да му се вярва.



Тази приказка се намира в книга 3-та от новата поредица в
Amazon Books (Kindle Edition):

Tales and Fables from Around the World: Book 3 (English & Bulgarian) / Приказки и басни от цял свят 3 (на английски и български език)
.
и в Е-книга No 16 от сайта

Ханс Кристиан Андерсен
ГЛУПАВИЯ ХАНС
двуезична книга с тестове с отговори и обяснения
.



© Двуезична Библиотека, колективен превод от английски

Двуезична литература в помощ на езиковото обучение по метода на Шлиман за сравнително четене